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Written by Lucy Pitts

To tile or not to tile?

If you’re thinking of refurbishing your conservatory, one of the questions you may have are whether you can tile the roof and if so, whether it’s advisable to do so? So we thought it might be helpful to run through some of the main points to consider:

 

Can you install tiles on your existing conservatory? 

In most cases the answer to this is yes, but we would need to know a little more about your conservatory before we confirm this. The tiles we use are imitation slate. They look almost exactly like slate but are made from state-of-the-art materials which means they are super lightweight, in fact they weigh as little as 12kg per square metre. That means that when combined with the reroofing system and structure that we use, they can be added to almost any conservatory. However, if for some reason your roof is unsuitable (perhaps because it’s a flat roof) we can suggest suitable alternatives.

Is it a good idea to add tiles to an existing conservatory?

Again, in almost all cases, the answer to this is yes, and for a number of reasons.

  • Our tiles are very durable and long lasting. The product we use is fully tested to BBA, ETA and CE standards, including fire rating, wind, driven snow and rain, and water absorption and come with a 40-year warranty. With tiles in place you no longer have to worry about panes of glass cracking or breaking in adverse weather or leaks and repairs and it’s a great way to extend the life of your conservatory.
  • Tiles add an extra layer of insulation which not only improves the thermal efficiency of your conservatory but also reduces external noise like traffic or rain and gives you a little bit more privacy. Neighbours can no longer see in from their upstairs window and it’s an extra deterrent for burglars.
  • Whilst the slate we use is not made from recycled plastics, it is made from recyclable virgin limestone and polypropylene.
  • Our tiles look amazing. They come in a range of colours and create a really stylish and smart finish to your conservatory whilst reducing the amount of ongoing maintenance required.
  • They’re quick and easy to install – no cutting of tiles required!

 

We use Tapco Slate which are a Local Authority Building Control (LABC) and Local Authority Building Standards Scotland (LABSS) Registered Details product. In fact, they are the only BBA approved synthetic slate with minimum pitch capability of 14° on felt and batten and fully boarded roof applications.

We do appreciate that opting to tile your conservatory roof is a big decision, so why don’t you give us a call. We’ll be happy to talk you through the system we use and discuss your particular conservatory in more detail to see if it is suitable. No obligation, no hard sell, just useful information to help you make a decision.

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